Notizie

The situation of human trafficking in South Eastern Europe

Victims of human trafficking in South Eastern Europe (SEE), particularly minors, are increasingly being trafficked for forced labour, begging and delinquency.

     

Scritto da Sofia News Agency

Bulgaria is among the main countries of origin for victims of trafficking in South Eastern Europe, according to a report of the International Organization for Migration.

Victims of human trafficking in South Eastern Europe (SEE), particularly minors, are increasingly being trafficked for forced labour, begging and delinquency, the Second Annual Report on Victims of Trafficking in South Eastern Europe warned. The report is produced by the Regional Clearing Point (RCP), an IOM managed programme and presents the most comprehensive picture to date of trafficking in South Eastern Europe.

The report, which was conducted in cooperation with numerous counter-trafficking organisations highlights the fact that victims are trafficked from, through and to SEE for a variety of purposes including labour, begging and adoption – and not just for sexual exploitation.

Albania, Romania, Moldova and to a lesser extent Bulgaria and the province of Kosovo (Serbia and Montenegro) represent 89% of the victims assisted in 2004. An increase is noted in the number of victims who are trafficked from Croatia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro, which until now had been countries of transit and destination.

Ukraine remains the primary country of origin for victims of trafficking to SEE, with an increasing number of victims trafficked from distant countries such as China, Iraq, Georgia, Mongolia, Lebanon, Armenia and Uzbekistan.

Work abroad continues to be the main reason that drives most trafficking victims to leave home, as many victims are unemployed, underemployed or suffer from low salaries at home.

However, the report notes that recruitment through bogus job advertisements and job agencies is less common in the region as the general public is more aware of the dangers of accepting dubious jobs abroad. Instead, new recruitment methods – such as the ‘lover-boy` and the use of female recruiters, often victims or former victims themselves, are employed.

17 September 2005

Sull'autore